September 2012


The way I see it, our choices are between a candidate who is globally savvy and a candidate who is America-Centric. As a self-professed Air Force brat turned global citizen, I most identify with and support the views of our globally savvy candidate. I know from experience that globally reared “brats” of any kind are typically misunderstood and sometimes incomprehensible by our fellow citizens.

When I was in high school at Ramstein AFB, Germany, and even upon my return to work and live during the Summer between undergrad and graduate school as part of a German-American Business Exchange program, I recall conversations in which I expressed my view of America as being a spoiled, rich teenager, as in all kinds of power and money though lacking life experience. America is a powerful culture, yet one of the most isolationist in the world. Our general population is one of the least traveled, at least outside our borders, so “we, the people” as a collective have very little idea of what has gone and currently goes before us.  We are a truly independent civilization based on our heritage.  I will concede this may be a fundamental foundation for the valued and admirable creativity we bring the world.  As Winston Churchill described, “You can always count on Americans to do the right thing—after they’ve tried everything else.” Very telling of a need to go it alone, figure it out on our own, because “our parents don’t know crap.”

So, when are we going to grow up and realize that those who have gone before us, some long before us, might have some wisdom to share?  It doesn’t mean we have to become any other country, we will always be America – the free, the brave, the creative.  We might just get farther faster, though, if we were to tap into pearls of wisdom out there that could fit our needs and trajectory.  There is also something to be said for graduating to interdependence, which I see as a natural maturation of our independence in which we appreciate who we are enough to appreciate that we do not and cannot bring it all and need our fellow man.

We have such an opportunity to mature into a respected – not by demand of others but by command of ourselves – effective partner in the world. What say you to taking that bull by the horns?

Sincerely,

~ Jacqueline

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I will admit upfront that I am by no means any kind of fiscal wizard, nor do I wish to be.  I will also qualify that for me science is the quantifiable analysis of God’s creation.  And, finally, I can only speak from that of which I am aware, so welcome more information.  That said…

I have continuously questioned economic growth.  I am primarily a feeler, in Meyers-Briggs terms, and it has never felt right to me that an economy should continually grow.  Oh, it feels better, for sure, than an economy in recession, but it seems to me the “feel goodness” of a growing economy has perhaps become a social addiction and one that has caused us to create economic bubbles to feign continued growth?

Beyond my feelings, I look to nature and science for information on the matter, and here are some thoughts based on current awareness.

1) Matter that continually grows, eventually destroys.  Ivy, bacteria, cancer cells come to mind.  David Suzuki speaks to this in his book: The Legacy: An Elder’s Vision for Our Sustainable Future on which I heard him interviewed recently.  Fascinating.

2) Has anyone noticed that as we grow the economy so do we grow our fiscal debt? I should also confess that I do not see economy as part of or based in nature but a human construct subject to laws of nature.  So, conceivably, what we’ve created we can adapt or even undo, assuming we put our collective minds to it.  And when we do, I propose doing so in a way that does not undermine society nor disrespect laws of nature.  Since it has taken us at least decades if not a century to reach this point, is it wise to think we can fix it in the near term without detrimental side effects?

3) How far exactly can we stretch a rubber band before it breaks or snaps back?  Are we perhaps in the throes of an economic breaking point or  snap back?  Are we prepared to release it gently or will we continue to let it smack us?

4) I wonder, did the concept of the Tao come about from centuries of a collective people witnessing the ebb and flow of life and living?

These are the thoughts that pass through my mind on the matter of fiscal responsibility, and as mentioned, not my area of expertise.  Given this, I am open and willing to becoming more informed by welcoming alternative perspectives.

Respectfully,
~ Jacqueline